What is risk Psoriasis: at What Who’s it, causes it, and

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25.06.2018

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  • What is risk Psoriasis: at What Who’s it, causes it, and
  • 7 Hidden Dangers of Psoriasis
  • Healthmonitor
  • Inverse psoriasis causes smooth patches of red, inflamed skin that worsen Smoking tobacco not only increases your risk of psoriasis but also. Read more about risk factors and triggers for this condition. of people who have it; antimalarials can cause psoriasis flare-ups typically two to. Obesity also can affect psoriasis treatment, increasing the risk of side effects from to cause psoriasis flares in around 30 percent of people who take them.

    What is risk Psoriasis: at What Who’s it, causes it, and

    Like her colleagues, Dr. Armstrong, a dermatologist and researcher with the University of Colorado, Denver, suspects inflammation is at the root of not only psoriasis but many of its comorbidities.

    Armstrong was the lead author of a study published in the journal Dermatology in May Based on National Psoriasis Foundation surveys among 5, psoriasis patients from to , "Psoriasis Comorbidities" was the largest study to date that used body surface area to measure psoriasis severity and its relationship to comorbidities.

    The study found that the more severe the psoriasis, the greater the odds of developing comorbidities. The study also found that patients with severe psoriasis — defined as more than 10 percent of body surface area coverage — are more likely to have diabetes compared to those with mild to moderate disease.

    In addition, psoriatic arthritis occurs more frequently in patients with severe psoriasis, and patients usually have psoriasis first. The important message of the study, Armstrong said, is that patients with psoriasis should not only treat their skin disease but also be tested for comorbidities. As a cardiologist, Mehta recommends people with psoriasis lead a lifestyle that can help reduce the risk of heart disease and obesity, two of the most common comorbidities.

    That entails maintaining a healthy weight, not smoking, eating a low-fat diet rich in fruits, vegetables and lean protein, and getting regular exercise. But controlling those factors can be difficult. Manganello said that, for her, the conditions feed on each other.

    Because she's in pain from fibromyalgia, she has difficulty moving. Being sedentary leads to weight gain. Weight gain causes stress, making her psoriasis worse. Manganello has scheduled a gastric bypass for February and is hoping her health will improve as she loses weight, but in the meantime, she's watching her diet and eating foods that don't promote inflammation.

    Elizabeth Prater, a dermatologist specializing in medical dermatology at Integris Health in Oklahoma City, said it's important that dermatologists discuss risk factors for coronary artery disease with psoriasis patients. Because atherosclerosis — hardening of the arteries — and psoriasis are both inflammatory diseases, Prater said that decreasing the overall inflammation may be beneficial to both problems.

    Wu, director of dermatology research and associate residency program director in the department of dermatology at Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, is the lead author of the study in the Archives of Dermatology in November that found psoriasis patients who were on drugs that block tumor necrosis factor-alpha TNF-alpha , a molecule associated with psoriasis inflammation, had a much lower risk of heart attacks compared to patients whose psoriasis was treated with topical agents.

    Wu said that a second article published in the Journal of Internal Medicine a month after supported his findings. However, he said, because both studies looked backward in time, "the most we can say is that there is an association of TNF-alpha inhibitor use and the reduction of myocardial infarction heart attack risk. Wu agreed with Prater that long-term studies are needed to fully explain the relationship between TNF-alpha inhibitor use and heart attack risk in psoriasis patients.

    For her part, ever since Beckwith learned she had pre-diabetes, she has been monitoring her blood sugar and eating a diet of mostly fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein.

    She stopped drinking soda and other drinks high in sugar, and so far, she hasn't crossed the line into a diabetes diagnosis. Beckwith, who has been taking methotrexate for her psoriasis since February , finds the treatment also helps her psoriatic arthritis.

    And her heart condition has been under better control since her doctors, working together, have reduced her inflammation. Looking for more information on comborbidities? Contact our Patient Navigation Center. Our Patient Navigators provide free guidance to help you live a healthy life with psoriatic disease.

    Learn how you can help our advocacy team shape the laws and policies that affect people with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis — in your state and across the country. Help us raise funds to support research by joining Team NPF , where you can walk, run, cycle, play bingo or create your own fundraising event. If you or someone you love needs free, personalized support for living a healthier life with psoriatic disease, contact our Patient Navigation Center.

    And keep the National Psoriasis Foundation going strong by making a donation today. Together, we will find a cure. The National Psoriasis Foundation NPF is a non-profit organization with a mission to drive efforts to cure psoriatic disease and improve the lives of those affected.

    The National Psoriasis Foundation does not endorse or accept any responsibility for the content of external websites. The National Psoriasis Foundation does not endorse any specific treatments or medications for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Login Become a Member. Have questions about psoriatic disease? Does psoriasis increase your risk for obesity and heart disease? Does psoriasis cause comorbidities? Mehta said that psoriasis is definitely in play when it comes to the risk of comorbidities. Mehta agrees, saying the link is there. The role of lifestyle As a cardiologist, Mehta recommends people with psoriasis lead a lifestyle that can help reduce the risk of heart disease and obesity, two of the most common comorbidities.

    Impact of biologics Dr. Orenstein is a freelance medical and health writer based in eastern Pennsylvania. Putting patients at the center of psoriasis treatments. Introducing the new standard of treatment for PsA. When work unbalances life, psoriatic disease takes over. A new clinical trial researching the effectiveness and safety of home-based Ellen Clements overcomes flares, joint pain and bullies in the office to Getting by with PsA until you get insurance.

    High blood pressure is a health risk because it increases your chances of having a heart attack or stroke. If you have psoriasis, it's important to have your blood pressure checked regularly and to keep your pressure under control. Research shows that people with severe psoriasis are more likely to have a major heart attack or stroke and die from heart disease than people who do not have psoriasis — specifically, a 6.

    The health risk is significant, and you should do all you can for better heart health, says Dr. That includes quitting smoking, exercising, eating a heart-healthy diet , and reducing stress.

    Psoriatic arthritis causes pain, stiffness, and swelling in and around your joints and tendons, and 10 to 30 percent of people with psoriasis, possibly more, will develop it. In fact, as many as one in four people might have undiagnosed psoriatic arthritis.

    Symptoms include joints or tendons that are warm, tender, and painful, pain in the low back, feet and ankles, sausage-like swelling of fingers, and changes in your nails. If you have any of the symptoms of psoriatic arthritis , talk to your doctor because the earlier psoriatic arthritis is diagnosed, the better your chances of preventing or slowing disabling joint damage.

    People with psoriasis are more at risk and should be evaluated by their provider and take steps to control cholesterol and glucose, research from the University of Pennsylvania found.

    The researchers looked at data collected by more than 1, general practitioners who saw patients in the United Kingdom over a year period and found a higher incidence of heart attacks among those with psoriasis. The risk was greatest among those who were young and who had severe psoriasis, Boh says.

    The study emphasizes the need to closely monitor your cholesterol , among other comorbid conditions, if you have psoriasis. Women with psoriasis are 63 percent more likely to develop diabetes than those without psoriasis, according to research that tracked more than , women over 14 years found, and the results are believed to apply to men, too. The diabetes-psoriasis connection means you should be sure to have your blood sugar checked regularly, and adopt a healthy lifestyle to prevent diabetes, Boh says — don't smoke, maintain a healthy weight, eat well, and exercise regularly.

    One surprising psoriasis side effect: Research shows that people with psoriasis are actually 15 percent more likely to have abdominal or belly fat than those without it. Now we know they are there from the get-go and just evolving over time. Lose weight and your psoriasis will be easier to control. To stop the cycle that can lead to excess body weight, take steps to feel more comfortable about your appearance and streamline your diet — less fat and more fruits and vegetables.

    Research shows that people with severe psoriasis are much more likely to experience depression, anxiety , and suicidal thoughts. Using data from the United Kingdom, the researchers found that people with psoriasis have a nearly 40 percent greater risk for depression than those who don't have the chronic condition.

    Psoriasis can't be cured, Boh says, but it can be controlled. Work with your doctor to manage your psoriasis as best as possible, she says, and you'll feel better about yourself. Also, don't hesitate to address your emotional health with your psoriasis care team , especially if you feel depressed.

    7 Hidden Dangers of Psoriasis

    Doctors really aren't sure, but they have identified a number of risk factors that could make Learn more about what causes psoriasis at WebMD. People who are obese tend to get plaques in their skin creases and folds. WebMD offers seven reasons your psoriasis might flare up. Psoriasis symptoms may worsen in people who have HIV. Trauma to the skin. In some people with Next In Psoriasis Causes & Risk Factors. Drugs That Can. Psoriatic arthritis is a kind of arthritis that is more likely to affect people with psoriasis. Symptoms include swelling, inflammation, and pain.

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    Comments

    GGnewbie

    Doctors really aren't sure, but they have identified a number of risk factors that could make Learn more about what causes psoriasis at WebMD. People who are obese tend to get plaques in their skin creases and folds.

    g3nom3

    WebMD offers seven reasons your psoriasis might flare up. Psoriasis symptoms may worsen in people who have HIV. Trauma to the skin. In some people with Next In Psoriasis Causes & Risk Factors. Drugs That Can.

    DcLoi

    Psoriatic arthritis is a kind of arthritis that is more likely to affect people with psoriasis. Symptoms include swelling, inflammation, and pain.

    brock1994

    Find out who gets psoriasis and what really causes it. in families: If a parent, grandparent, brother, or sister has psoriasis, you have a higher risk of getting it.

    nobl114

    Psoriasis can be activated by weather, stress, and other everyday triggers. The risk was greatest among those who were young and who had severe psoriasis.

    yur43mag

    Psoriasis can increase your risk for other health complications. 10 years after the initial psoriasis diagnosis as the inflammation caused by the higher than that of people who don't have psoriasis, and your risk for stroke is.

    ARTES53

    While the exact cause of psoriasis is still unknown, there is growing evidence families are more likely to get the disease than members of families who do not.

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